The Greatest Environmental Threat?

August 23, 2015 at 4:42 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | 5 Comments
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As you perhaps know, earlier this week the Associated Press reported that in the month after it was published, fewer than half of the Catholics in the United States had heard of Pope Francis’s encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si’. And only 23% of U.S. Catholics had heard about it at Mass.

Because of this, I was pleased to see that on July 22 the Bishop of the Diocese of Brooklyn, Nicholas Di Marzio, chose to use his regular column in the diocesan newspaper, The Tablet to tell the people of the diocese about Laudato Si’, and to urge them to study it using resources provided on the web page.

That is to say, I was pleased until I got to the following paragraph in the article:

“If we are to look at our environment in our world today, the most dangerous place for human beings seems to be a woman’s womb. In our own country, almost one million abortions are performed each year, not to count the worldwide number of abortions. Truly, the environment that is most dangerous to human beings and the one which causes the most direct threat is the misunderstanding of contraception and population control. Abortion can never be an answer to our ecological and psychological problems as human beings. Pope Francis says, ‘To blame population growth instead of extreme and selective consumerism on the part of some, is one way of refusing to face the issues.’ He goes on to say, ‘A just society recognizes the primacy of the right to life from conception to natural death.'”

I was somewhat shocked by the bishop’s suggestion that abortion and contraception are the greatest threats to the  environment in today’s world. Pope Francis does speak out several times against abortion and against lack of respect for life more broadly. But the remarkable thing about the encyclical is that in it Pope Francis explains that these sins are integrally connected with other grievous sins against the poor and creation. Without saying so explicitly, he undercuts the ideological hierarchy of his predecessors in which sexual sins are vastly more serious than social ones.

I decided to write a letter to the Tablet explaining that what DiMarzio says is not what the encyclical says. I figured the odds on the letter getting published were .00000000000001. A month later, I realize that those odds were too optimistic.  So instead of sharing my thoughts in the Tablet, I’m sharing them here with you:

Dear Editor,

My deepest thanks to Bishop DiMarzio for his recent “Put Out into the Deep” column on Pope Francis’s encyclical, Laudato Si’: On Care For Our Common Home (July 22). I was especially moved by the Bishop’s memories of how his own grandfather “Francesco,” embodied one of the points Pope “Francesco” stresses in his encyclical, never wasting what God has given us, never colluding in today’s “throwaway” culture.

I am also grateful that Bishop DiMarzio’s calls us to study Laudato Si’ and provides a link to the Tablet’s on-line study guide. With Protestants, Jews, Muslims, and other religious people around the world, not to mention atheists, Marxists, and “nones,” reading and responding to the encyclical, it certainly seems fitting that we Catholics should do so as well!

My one concern about the Bishop’s column is that he seems to suggest that the environment that causes “the most direct threat” to human beings is “the misunderstanding of contraception and population control.” Of course, Pope Francis does clearly state on several occasions in Laudato Si’ that abortion and lack of respect for life are part of the throwaway culture that threatens God’s creation.

But it would be a mistake to say that Laudato Si’ places abortion and contraception at the top of a hierarchy of sins against God’s creation. It is no coincidence that in his chapter on “integral ecology,” that is, on the inherent connection between all things, Pope Francis stresses the integral connection between environmental destruction and “the sexual exploitation of children and abandonment of the poor… buying the organs of the poor for resale, or eliminating children because they are not what their parents wanted. This same use and throw away logic generates so much waste because of the disordered desire to consume more than what is really necessary.” (123)

Pope Francis affirms the Church’s teaching on the preciousness of unborn life. He also challenges us to realize that this precious life extends to all of God’s creation–the earth we live on, the water we drink, the plants we eat and the air we breathe, and that we must revere all of it.

Sincerely,

Marian Ronan, Ph.D.

Research Professor of Catholic Studies

New York Theological Seminary

475 Riverside Drive

NY, NY 10115.

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5 Comments »

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  1. Is there a general Brooklyn paper — or a women’s paper — to which you might submit this, or some variant of your letter with an explanatory introduction?

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    • As usual, you’re far mores strategic than I, Regina. I doubt they would publish this letter now that I’ve already done so but I’ll keep such possibility i
      in mind the next time a letter of mine doesn’t get published (probably soon!).

      Like

  2. Thanks, Marian! I have had similar dismay at any “official” Catholic commentary. For instance, the pamphlet produced by Our Sunday Visitor does not mention the Pope’s many references to the consumer society in which we are embedded as a major source of the imbalances in our society and failure to recognize how we as Americans are causing many of the problems.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. […] posts ago, before the crabapple tree and the carrot soup, I shared with you my letter to the Catholic newspaper of the Diocese of Brooklyn, The Tablet, about Bishop Di Marzio’s column on Pope […]

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  4. As a UCCer, I see the _lack_ of contraception as possibly the worst environmental disaster, causing all the rest, including climate change as more and more countries industrialize. Of course. the demographic transition takes place, but will it be in time?

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